How to Control the Butterflies and Survive Your Next Workshop Presentation

Feeling some nervousness before and during your workshop is a natural thing. Actually, I rather have some butterflies than a bumblebee flying around in my stomach. It protects me from getting stung with the venom of cocky. But, too much nervousness can be harmful. Here’s how you can control your nervousness and conduct effective, memorable presentations:

1. Know the room.

Be familiar with the place in which you will speak. Arrive early.
I usually suggest no less than 6o minutes before the start of your session.
Practice using the microphone and any other audiovisual equipment you plan to use.

2. Know the audience.

Greet your participants as they arrive. It’s easier to
speak to a group of new friends than to a group of strangers.

3. Know your material.

If you’re not familiar with your material or are uncomfortable with it, your nervousness will increase. Practice the delivery of your workshop. If you must refer to a prepared script than practice reading sections and maximize eye contact with your audience.

4. Relax.

Ease tension by doing exercises and stretches. Simple push-ups on the wall can work wonders. However, you do other things like practicing your smile and stretching your face muscles. Don’t forget to stretch those neck muscles too. Oops did I mention deep breathing?

5. Visualize yourself giving your workshop the days before and as you travel to the workshop site.

Imagine yourself speaking, your voice loud, clear, and confident. See your participants looking attentive and interactive. When you visualize yourself doing a good job, you will be successful.

6. Believe that people want you to succeed.

Most workshop participants want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative, and entertaining.
They don’t want you to fail. Don’t you feel the same way about your trainer and facilitator when you are a workshop participant?

7. Don’t apologize.

If you mention your nervousness or apologize for any problems you think you have with your presentation, you may be calling the audience’s attention to something they may not have noticed. Keep silent. Remember -if you point to the sweat, they will see it!

8. FOCUS on your important messages.

Focus your attention away from your own inner anxieties, and outwardly toward your messages and your audience. Your nervousness will dissipate.

9. Gain experience by presenting as often as you can.

Experience builds confidence. Like any skills set -the more you do it the better you will get! That includes mistakes. Also, check out a Toastmasters club in your area. It is a great place to build your confidence for workshops and speeches. (www.Toastmasters.org)
10. Put your butterflies into a flying formation by turning your nervousness into positive energy.

Harness your nervous energy and transform it into vitality and enthusiasm. Allow your passion to ooze out whenever possible.

Software tools every Field Service company needs in 2022

Software has revolutionised the Field Service industry, providing tools to automate business processes, schedule jobs and maintenance, and generate reports. With leading software tools, Field Service companies can improve business processes and productivity, support field technicians, and ultimately improve their bottom line. In 2022, every Field Service business should invest in software tools, including these essential solutions.

Vehicle Tracking Software

With Vehicle Tracking Software, you can support your mobile workers when they’re in the field. You can view the real-time location of your employees during work hours, assist them if they’re lost, or there’s an emergency, and ensure they arrive at job sites on time. Vehicle Tracking Software makes reactive planning easier, with the option to send the nearest available worker to a job site to save time and reduce fuel consumption.

Job Management System

Reduce your admin time and paperwork using a Job Management System. You can use the online platform to schedule jobs ahead of time, track job progress, get job approval on-site, and generate job reports. Technicians can access their Job Sheets online, removing the need for paper documents, and clients can complete and sign forms online. These mobile documents will be stored on a secure cloud-based system that you and your team can access anywhere.

Asset Management Software

Field Service businesses have multiple assets that need to be managed, tracked, and maintained, and Asset Management Software is the key to simplifying these challenging tasks. With Asset Management Software, you can schedule maintenance jobs and record all the asset maintenance work performed. If your vehicles or machines need to be serviced regularly, you can schedule recurring appointments. These tasks will appear on the designated technician’s calendar every week, month, or year – as often as maintenance jobs need to be done.

Quoting System

Creating and sending Quotes can be time-consuming, but this process can be simplified with a Quoting System. When a client shares a request for your services, you can quickly generate and email them a Quote. You can use the system to keep track of Quotes that have been accepted or rejected and follow up on proposals that haven’t received a response. Once a Quote has been accepted, the document can be converted into a Job Sheet with all the information the technician needs to complete the task.

Invoicing Software

With Invoicing Software, your technicians don’t need to wait for your admin team to send an Invoice once they’ve completed a job. The software automatically generates an Invoice when a job is closed, using the expenses and other information from the Job Sheet to create the document. Once the Invoice has been emailed to the client, you can keep an eye out for payment and set up an automatic reminder if they don’t pay on time.

Inventory Management System

With an Inventory Management System, your team can track and manage your inventory items. You can reduce storage costs, maximise warehouse space, and optimise stock levels by preventing understocking and overstocking. The system can be used to track your inventory to ensure all items required for jobs are available at the correct warehouse or stored in the worker’s vehicle. With a cloud-based Inventory Management System, your team can check inventory and capture the data while in the warehouse with their mobile devices.

Personal Information – How Much Should a Presenter Reveal?

Have you ever sat through a dry an boring speech? Of course you have, we all have. Did you spend any time trying to figure out why the speech was so dry? I’m going to bet that at least one of the reasons is that the speaker didn’t connect with the presenter – the speech content itself was impersonal. Did you know that it’s possible for a speaker to go too far in the other direction also?

A Speech That Nobody Wants To Hear
Once upon a time I had the misfortune to attend a speech that was being given by a presenter who had been married four times. Now the fact that he had been married so many times was no big deal, but the speech was on how to choose the correct investment plan for a 401k. During the speech, the speaker must have “revealed” aspects about his four different marriages at least 30 times. To this day I really couldn’t tell you anything about the different funds that one could use as part of their 401k plan, but I can vividly recall aspects of each of this guy’s marriages. This was a clear case of TMI: too-much-information. No the speech wasn’t boring, but the amount of personal information that was being shared overpowered the message. There’s got to be a balance.

So Where Do You Draw The Line?
All of us desperately want to avoid giving boring speeches. However, we also want to make sure that our speeches have an impact – and if we’re sharing too much personal information this isn’t going to happen. Here are some tips on how to draw the line between too much and too little personal information correctly:

  • Match Your Speech Type: certain types of speeches naturally lend themselves more readily to having personal information included in them. Speeches in which you are trying to persuade or entertain your audience are great vehicles for more personal information. Speeches to inform are not.
  • Match Your Audience: Who is in your audience (and why are they there)? If you have a business audience who are looking for ways to keep their business afloat during a severe economic downturn, then your childhood stories are not going to be appropriate. However, if your are speaking to a Garden Club filled with mothers, then perhaps a childhood story might be the perfect way to establish rapport.
  • Stay On Topic: Sharing personal information just because it makes a great story (like my 401k presenter did) is a bad idea. You need to make sure that the story ties in with what your speech is all about. If it doesn’t, then skip it.
  • Listen To Your Audience: In the end, it all comes down to what your audience wants to hear. If, while you are giving your speech, you start to detect that your audience is not staying with you, then cut back on the personal information and instead focus on your core content.

Final Thoughts
This is one of those tough areas where you are going to have to rely on your speaker’s judgement. Sometimes you’ll get it right and sometimes you might be off the mark and include either too little or too much personal information in one of your speeches. However, keep at it and refine each speech the next time you give it. In the end, you’ll know how much personal information to include in order to be able to intimately connect with your audience and make an lasting impact in their lives.