How to Negotiate Your Salary Effectively

When you get a new job or when you ask for a raise, a salary negotiation usually takes place. This represents a sticking point for many people, because they don’t know how to negotiate effectively and they often end up getting lower salaries than they deserve.

As a communication coaching, I’ve been teaching many of my clients how to negotiate their salaries effectively. Here are the steps that work best for them:

1. Know the market. It’s important to know what a fair salary is for your job, in the kind of company you work for and considering your responsibilities. In order to do so, you must know the market. So make sure you do your homework and you come to the negotiation with a good understanding of the salaries in your niche.

2. Show results. The only really efficient way to justify asking for a certain salary is through your results. Your employer can best be persuaded to give you the salary you want if you prove to them that you can add a lot of value. Your previous results are the ones you can use to imply the future results you’ll create.

3. Ask for more than you really want. By requesting a bigger salary than the one you really want, you leave room for negotiation. Thus, you can make a compromise during the negotiation; you can lower your salary demands and this way only reach the salary you’re really aiming for. This is a simple but highly helpful negotiation technique.

4. Stand your ground. Many employees compromise a lot during a negotiation because they are afraid that if they don’t they’ll lose the job. However, this fear is many times unrealistic and exaggerated. Be willing to stand your ground and take some risks in a negotiation. If you truly are a valuable employee, you will get the salary you’re asking for.

With good salary negotiation skills, you can get benefits many employees only dream of, and you can ensure top compensation for your work.

How to Control the Butterflies and Survive Your Next Workshop Presentation

Feeling some nervousness before and during your workshop is a natural thing. Actually, I rather have some butterflies than a bumblebee flying around in my stomach. It protects me from getting stung with the venom of cocky. But, too much nervousness can be harmful. Here’s how you can control your nervousness and conduct effective, memorable presentations:

1. Know the room.

Be familiar with the place in which you will speak. Arrive early.
I usually suggest no less than 6o minutes before the start of your session.
Practice using the microphone and any other audiovisual equipment you plan to use.

2. Know the audience.

Greet your participants as they arrive. It’s easier to
speak to a group of new friends than to a group of strangers.

3. Know your material.

If you’re not familiar with your material or are uncomfortable with it, your nervousness will increase. Practice the delivery of your workshop. If you must refer to a prepared script than practice reading sections and maximize eye contact with your audience.

4. Relax.

Ease tension by doing exercises and stretches. Simple push-ups on the wall can work wonders. However, you do other things like practicing your smile and stretching your face muscles. Don’t forget to stretch those neck muscles too. Oops did I mention deep breathing?

5. Visualize yourself giving your workshop the days before and as you travel to the workshop site.

Imagine yourself speaking, your voice loud, clear, and confident. See your participants looking attentive and interactive. When you visualize yourself doing a good job, you will be successful.

6. Believe that people want you to succeed.

Most workshop participants want you to be interesting, stimulating, informative, and entertaining.
They don’t want you to fail. Don’t you feel the same way about your trainer and facilitator when you are a workshop participant?

7. Don’t apologize.

If you mention your nervousness or apologize for any problems you think you have with your presentation, you may be calling the audience’s attention to something they may not have noticed. Keep silent. Remember -if you point to the sweat, they will see it!

8. FOCUS on your important messages.

Focus your attention away from your own inner anxieties, and outwardly toward your messages and your audience. Your nervousness will dissipate.

9. Gain experience by presenting as often as you can.

Experience builds confidence. Like any skills set -the more you do it the better you will get! That includes mistakes. Also, check out a Toastmasters club in your area. It is a great place to build your confidence for workshops and speeches. (www.Toastmasters.org)
10. Put your butterflies into a flying formation by turning your nervousness into positive energy.

Harness your nervous energy and transform it into vitality and enthusiasm. Allow your passion to ooze out whenever possible.

Personal Information – How Much Should a Presenter Reveal?

Have you ever sat through a dry an boring speech? Of course you have, we all have. Did you spend any time trying to figure out why the speech was so dry? I’m going to bet that at least one of the reasons is that the speaker didn’t connect with the presenter – the speech content itself was impersonal. Did you know that it’s possible for a speaker to go too far in the other direction also?

A Speech That Nobody Wants To Hear
Once upon a time I had the misfortune to attend a speech that was being given by a presenter who had been married four times. Now the fact that he had been married so many times was no big deal, but the speech was on how to choose the correct investment plan for a 401k. During the speech, the speaker must have “revealed” aspects about his four different marriages at least 30 times. To this day I really couldn’t tell you anything about the different funds that one could use as part of their 401k plan, but I can vividly recall aspects of each of this guy’s marriages. This was a clear case of TMI: too-much-information. No the speech wasn’t boring, but the amount of personal information that was being shared overpowered the message. There’s got to be a balance.

So Where Do You Draw The Line?
All of us desperately want to avoid giving boring speeches. However, we also want to make sure that our speeches have an impact – and if we’re sharing too much personal information this isn’t going to happen. Here are some tips on how to draw the line between too much and too little personal information correctly:

  • Match Your Speech Type: certain types of speeches naturally lend themselves more readily to having personal information included in them. Speeches in which you are trying to persuade or entertain your audience are great vehicles for more personal information. Speeches to inform are not.
  • Match Your Audience: Who is in your audience (and why are they there)? If you have a business audience who are looking for ways to keep their business afloat during a severe economic downturn, then your childhood stories are not going to be appropriate. However, if your are speaking to a Garden Club filled with mothers, then perhaps a childhood story might be the perfect way to establish rapport.
  • Stay On Topic: Sharing personal information just because it makes a great story (like my 401k presenter did) is a bad idea. You need to make sure that the story ties in with what your speech is all about. If it doesn’t, then skip it.
  • Listen To Your Audience: In the end, it all comes down to what your audience wants to hear. If, while you are giving your speech, you start to detect that your audience is not staying with you, then cut back on the personal information and instead focus on your core content.

Final Thoughts
This is one of those tough areas where you are going to have to rely on your speaker’s judgement. Sometimes you’ll get it right and sometimes you might be off the mark and include either too little or too much personal information in one of your speeches. However, keep at it and refine each speech the next time you give it. In the end, you’ll know how much personal information to include in order to be able to intimately connect with your audience and make an lasting impact in their lives.